ASN GC statement on anti-Black racism

The ASN GC affirms that Black Lives Matter and that anti-Black racism has no place in our community. We encourage all ASN members to read the society’s statement condemning anti-Black racism here. The statement includes a list of actions that we can take, as well as resources.

Importantly, the statement also includes a place to share any ideas you may have about how the society can work to reduce racism and its effects within the scientific community. We are strongly committed to backing up our words with actions, and the society is currently discussing concrete plans for future programs and initiatives.

Please reach out if you would like to be involved in these efforts, or if you have ideas about what we can do as a community. We are also here to listen to anyone who is suffering or struggling in the aftermath of the horrifying recent events. You can reach ASN through the link above, and us on the grad council at ASNgrads ‘at’ gmail.com, or on twitter @asngrads.

Conflict resolution—a hard “soft” skill

We all experience conflicts in our professional and personal lives, and a lot of conflicts can be challenging to resolve for many reasons. Maybe there’s a power imbalance if you have a conflict with your advisor, or maybe there’s scientific and emotional tension if you are having trouble navigating the shared lab workspace. Also, if you are a people pleaser like me, you might be a conflict avoider, but often it can be healthy and productive to work to resolve a conflict. I’m going to outline a technique that you can try, suggest how to prepare for a conflict resolution conversation, and provide ideas for additional resources.

Ready to resolve some conflicts? Here we go!

A technique you can try: Here is one framework that you can use to facilitate having a conversation about a conflict and developing a plan for resolving that conflict. This framework has several steps, but following the whole progression will help to both set up the conversation in the best light and then help to make sure that things change as a result of the conversation. In addition to talking through feelings and experiences, developing a concrete plan is a critical piece of resolving a conflict. I learned about this method from a leadership development course for life scientists that I took at Cornell University. I highly recommend looking for similar opportunities on your campus (more on that below).

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